Inside the Sausage Factory: Sentence Correction (2 of 6)

Last time, we talked about how new questions are born (“You see, son, when a writer and an Official Guide love each other very much . . .” ) outside of GMAC’s underground bunker.  Questions are made of a variety of topics, and those topics are tested not only in the original question, but in the answer choices.  Perhaps this is obvious, but the easiest way to make new questions is to follow the example exactly.  Thus, from our example question (OG 13, pg. 672, #2) we can generate the following questions that have a certain, well, familiar sound to them:

Companies label light bulbs in lumens; if they label the lumens higher, the more visible light will be radiated by the bulb.
A. if they label the lumens higher, the more
B. labelling the lumens higher, it is that much more
C. the higher the lumens on the label, the more
D. the higher the lumens on the label, it is that much more that
E. when the lumens on the label are higher, the more it is

Seismologists measure earthquakes on the Richter Scale; if they give it a higher rating, the more intense the earthquake was.
A. if they give it a higher rating, the more intense
B. rating the earthquake higher, it is that much more intense
C. the higher they rate the earthquake, the more intense
D. the higher they rate the earthquake, it is that much more intense that
E. when the Richter Scale rating is higher, the more intense

Very cold temperatures are measured in degrees Kelvin; if they give it a low number, the closer the temperature is to absolute zero.
A.  if they give it a low number, the closer
B.  when the number is lower, the closer
C.  the lower the number, it is that much closer
D.  giving it a low number, it is that much closer
E.  the lower the number, the closer

Typographers measure font sizes in points; the higher the points, the larger the letters in that font.
A.  the higher the points, the larger the letters
B.  giving it higher points, it is that much larger
C.  when the points are higher, the larger the letters
D.  if they give it high points, the larger the letters
E.  the higher the points, it is that much larger

GMAT aspirants often value this type of authenticity; they know that the questions they’re seeing adhere closely to GMAC’s standards, and thus gravitate toward the familiar.  The problem is perhaps obvious to you if you worked your way through the questions above:  they get easier, just as the OG itself gets easier the more times you run through it.  You’re answering the same question repeatedly – I’d hope you’d get better at it!  I didn’t even change the order of the answer choices in the first two.

Next time we’ll explore how to make them more difficult!

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100004091319958 Jennifer John

    Nice post about GMAT Practice