Inside the Sausage Factory: Sentence Correction (3 of 6)

Last time we talked about replicating valuable official information as a supplement to your use of the Official Guide (you do own one, right?  If you are studying for the GMAT, you should!).  The answers, if you were worried, were CCEA.  If you weren’t worried, that was because doing the same question over and over again gets easy.  So, if you and your colleagues are studying for the exam and want to make questions to test each other, how can you use existing official questions as your models and vary the question so that it’s more challenging (by being unfamiliar) and in keeping with the laws of copyright?

The latter — not violating GMAC’s copyright, or anyone else’s, because it’s naughty — is easy:  don’t use the same words.  If possible, don’t be close.  The former — making it different enough to challenge somebody who’s memorized the OG — is trickier.  I am lazy and thus will subject my example sentences from last time to the following cruel grammatical experiments here.

1.  Make your sentence — or at least your question — longer.  This is the most obvious one.  Even if you don’t actually change how much is underlined, the fact is that most people read the whole sentence, because context is important and it’s relatively rare that you can entirely ignore one whole clause, as you could in the original OG question in this series.

If you lengthen the amount underlined, that can of course make things even trickier, and have other issues tested (going back to the different ways you can look at the same question, as we saw in the first installment).  The main way to make sentences longer is through additional relative clauses, prepositional phrases, and modifiers.  Make sure the underlining begins at the first point of difference and ends at the last one; if even one answer choice has a different first word and another one has a different last word, you underline the whole thing and pat yourself on the back for being evil.

Since the late 18th century, typographers, with varying historical lengths for the point generally converging on the modern 1/72 of an inch, have measured font sizes in points, the higher the points, it is that much larger in that font.

A.  Since the late 18th century, typographers, with varying historical lengths for the point generally converging on the modern 1/72 of an inch, have measured font sizes in points, the higher the points, it is that much larger
B.  Typographers have measured font sizes in points since the late 18th century, with varying historical lengths for the point generally converging on the modern 1/72 of an inch; giving it higher points, it is that much larger
C.  Since the late 18th century, typographers have measured font sizes in points, with varying historical lengths for the point generally converging on the modern 1/72 of an inch; when the points are higher, the larger the letters
D.  Generally converging on the modern 1/72 of an inch, typographers have measured font sizes in points since the late 18th century, with varying historical lengths for the point, and if they give it high points, the larger the letters
E.  Since the late 18th century, typographers have measured font sizes in points, with varying historical lengths for the point generally converging on the modern 1/72 of an inch; the higher the points, the larger the letters

I’m not patting myself on the back for being evil for my underlining, but I do feel a little bad for you.  This question now tests the same issue as before — the correlated comparative structure — but adds all the problems associated with long sentences, modifiers, and the correct joining of two independent clauses.  The answer, as well as more ways to make evil questions, are still to come!

Try Grockit FREE for 3 Days
Program
First Name
Email
Password
  • Anju Khare

    option e is the right answer i boz of comprasion rule ; the
    higher the points, the larger the letters